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Campus Women Lead

Winter 2008

Volume 36
Number 3

Globalizing Women's Education



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From Where I Sit

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Helen C. Sobehart  
Dr. Helen C. Sobehart
 

Women Leading Education across the Continents: Sharing the Knowledge and Fanning the Flame
By Helen C. Sobehart, associate provost and vice president for academic affairs, Duquesne University

I began my first job in academic administration twenty-five years ago. Having quickly observed that the “real work” happened at lunch, over drinks, and at the golf course, I participated in those activities with my colleagues who, of course, were male. One day my two attentive supervisors (a man and a woman) tried to “help” me by suggesting that engaging in such pursuits might seem improper to some and thus negatively impact my career. Though I never thought of myself as any kind of feminist, I immediately replied that I had to pave the way for the women who followed me, so I’d take the risk. I had committed to fanning the flame.



Yasmeen Yusuf-Khalil, Vivienne Bozalek, Grace Bantebya-Kyomuhendo, Kimberlee Staking, and Rivka Tuval-Mashiach meet to discuss their Women’s Health and Well-Being course  

Yasmeen Yusuf-Khalil, Vivienne Bozalek, Grace Bantebya-Kyomuhendo, Kimberlee Staking, and Rivka Tuval-Mashiach meet to discuss their Women’s Health and Well-Being course.

 

Women's Health and Well-Being: An International Teaching Collaboration
By Kimberlee Staking, doctoral candidate in Women's Studies at the University of Maryland--College Park

When I entered the doctoral program in Women’s Studies five years ago, I would never have envisioned myself becoming part of an international collaboration working to improve women’s health around the globe. I became involved with transnational teaching partnerships indirectly, through my work on the gendered aspects of visual representations in contemporary media across cultures. I viewed teaching visual literacy as a means of encouraging culturally informed, responsible citizenship, and I wanted to know which pedagogies would be most effective with my undergraduate students. My dissertation research on pedagogies led me to experiment with classroom uses for innovative new media technologies, which appeared to facilitate high-quality collaborations among my students. When given the opportunity in 2004 to expand my use of technology as a teaching tool across national borders, I jumped at the chance. 



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